Search ads by make

(un)Solved Mysteries

Title Filter 
Filter By Year 
Filter By Month 
Display # 
Weird Wednesday: <br>The Ambulance Mystery (UPDATE III: Bédélia)
This looks like a most uncomfortable way to get transported when wounded, even though it should be a speedy one. The picture of this cyclecar (click pic for enlargement) was discovered by Arnoud 'French Parts' van der Sman, while on a hunting trip for parts. He found a ‘garagiste’ who was about to quit and this newspaper cutting had been hanging on the wall of his dirty office for a long time....
The Coupe Body Mystery (UPDATE III: English? But not RR? American then?)
Recently James Long bought the remains of this body in the San Francisco bay area. The seller thought it was from a 1936 Gurney Nutting 20hp Rolls. However James is not sure as he has heard different opinions on the manufacturer. Some say it is English made, others say it’s French. The real unusual part is that it has no storage provisions, meaning there’s no trunk or rumble seat. The body is ...
King Farouk's Custom Mystery (UPDATE V: Dan LaLee Retractable Streamliner and Chris Craft)
The Egyptian King Farouk was famous for his abundant lifestyle, which included ownership of hundreds of prestigious cars. In 1952 he was forced to abdicate and went into exile where he continued his liking for luxury. Mahmoud Ezzeldin has sent us some photos of King Farouk with his cars and toys and in the meantime presented us with a mystery. It’s to be found in the line-up of the King's cars i...
Weird Wednesday: The XXXL Mystery (UPDATE IV: Panhard-Levassor or Altena?)
When Dutch expert on French motorcars Fons Alkemade presents us with a mystery, we are sure that it will be a tough nut to crack. Fons suspects this is a French make from around 1908, but the chain-driven car’s real feature is of course the XXXL trunk, made at a time when cars only had separate trunks. Why this extra long trunk? What was it used for? Please mail us your ideas! Update IV com...
The Westinghouse Mystery (UPDATE II: Packard?)
In the 1920’s servo assisted braking was only fitted to the most expensive American automobiles. So it came as a surprise that André Citroën decided to fit this device as standard equipment to the B14F, introduced in 1926 and later to the AC4 and C6. These servo’s were mounted on the chassis and built by Citroën having obtained a licence from Westinghouse. Nowadays parts for these French-bu...
The Atlantic Crossing Mystery
For more than two years Eric Courtois from Luxemburg owns this 1936 Mercedes-Benz 230 W21 convertible (# 139716). It was in a fairly good nick when he bought it, but as Eric plans to use it intensely for rallies, he has given it a huge mechanical service. He even treated the Merc to a new hood and new seats. On the to-do list only remains the steering that has to be a bit softened and finally a re...
The disappearing Buick beard mystery.
We received two Buick photos form Jos Cox (NL) who knows all about Amilcars but not about Buicks. Let alone when the Buick makes beards appear and sometimes makes beards disappear.... We can't help with that but we did with the radiator mascot. First we were mislead by our own -wrong- assumption it could be Victoire by Lalique. But we landed on our feet in time and found it must be the 1928 Buick...
Weird Wednesday: The Maier Mystery (see UPDATE)
Frank Kirch wrote to us telling that one of his friends owns this weird and wonderful streamlined body. It was fabricated in or around 1935 by a Berlin-based company called "Leichtbau Maier". Handmade, it was probably used as a prototype for a larger car manufacturer, perhaps as a show-model or as an example of Maier’s skills. We don’t know, but to us it looks very much like an attempt to copy...
A Renault Engine Mystery? (UPDATE: GS 1919-20)
Stig Fransson from Sweden has a problem. He owns two Renaults type DM, one from 1913, the other a 1914. One already restored, the other soon to be finished. About fifteen years ago he bought an engine believing it to be a Renault from around 1912/13. However, the more he looks at it, the more he begins to doubt that it really is a Renault. There’s too much difference between this engine and his ...
The Swiss Model Mystery (UPDATE: Sunbeam ? )
In 1914 the Swiss capital Bern hosted the National Exhibition, a trade fair to show the national products and industries of Switzerland. There were several themes like agriculture, mining and trades. In the engineering section an inventor from the South of Switzerland, Mr. Luigi (Luisin) Piffaretti, showed a car model that had been completely handcrafted by him. It had working back wheels, which c...
The Cozette Mystery (see UPDATE IV: Cozette or Fiat 507/519 or BNC ? )
Mike Tebbett met these two smiling ladies recently at a local flea market; that is to say their photo. Probably shot with a brandnew Brownie or why not some contemporary French stuff. The registration number of the car looks French, but according to the writing on the back the snaps were taken in Italy. The script on the radiator says "Cozette” and on the back of some of the photos also the name...
A one off mystery? (UPDATE: Opel Laubfrosch?)
A recent acquisition by Poul Jensen of Denmark is this attractive two door roadster. Yes it would benefit from adding some basic mechanics and eventually even a spray. Yet at this point Poul is not sure what to add? It would be easy to say Model A Ford, but the fact we have to do with a RHD makes that option a bit less obvious. So what;s the alternative? Something British? Mwah..., don't think so....
The Balloon Tyre Mystery (UPDATE II: Spoof photo ? )
When Bozi SVVS Mohacek sends a mystery photo, we know that it will be a tough nut to crack. Just look at those big fabric type balloon tyres and mighty wheels. The car has quite a reasonable rear entrance tonneau body on a very basic chassis, but a completely unfinished bonnet; it’s just a bit of old corrugated tin! The logo on the body is very unclear but the step plate bracket shows an address...
The Egyptian Mystery (UPDATE III: Stutz and Gräf & Stift!)
Last week we received an email from Mahmoud Ezzeldin. He wrote that for the past five years he has been organizing Vintage & Classic Automobile events in Egypt, but that he is also building a database of classic cars in Egypt. Mahmoud recently found a family photo album with snapshots of several impressive cars, which he didn’t recognize. We especially liked the one with the family posing in fro...
The Steaming Swan Mystery (UPDATE: bathtub faucet !)
Not long ago Bharat Seth from Kanpur in India bought this mascot of a swan. He was told that the swan was supposed to have graced a car powered by steam. Bharat has no further information, except that the mascot is 10.5 inches high and has no maker’s marks on it. We immediately thought of the 1910 Brooke Swan Car that belongs to the Louwman Collection in The Netherlands. Could there be a connect...
The non-stop Humber Mystery (UPDATE II: Who was Mr. Perrot?)
Andy Watt is a distant relative of Louis Coatalen, the French engineer who designed aircraft engines and racing cars. At the turn of the previous century Coatalen also worked for Humber as chief engineer. Recently Andy found some pictures of Louis together with a letter (click!) dating from 1952 to Gordon Wilkin (editor: Wilkins, sic!) then editor of The Autocar. The pictures are of a Humber 8-10 ...
The Control Mystery (UPDATE II: Cadillac?)
This picture of an early spark and throttle control was sent to us by Mark Michel. Mark hasn’t got a clue as to what car it belongs to. The levers of the control are nickel plated brass and all other parts are nickel plated steel. The rod is 44 inches (app. 112 cm) long. So we’ll make today’s mystery nice and simple… what is it? Can we help Mark? Tell us! Update II by Hugh Nutting: "I...
An invalid mystery? (update: Argson)
Check this somewhat arty greenish photos of a mystery tricycle sent by Lovat Turnbull from the UK. "Can you please help me identify my vintage trike. It has a Villiers engine and I think it was made by Stanley engineering. It is similar to the Argson Runnymede but it's not an invalid car." Now Lovat may have reason to say it is not an invalid tricycle, but based on his own information we googled ...
The Benz Bumper Mystery (UPDATE: Hupmobile?)
Some time ago Walter Nieuwkoop bought a 1936 Mercedes Benz 290 from one of the PreWarCar adverts. Walter knew that the Merc had the wrong bumpers and bonnet, but that presented no problem as he already had the correct parts to restore it to its former glory. But Walter would very much like to know from what car his leftovers came from. The bumpers look very American to us, which could well be true...
The Fiat Roadster Mystery (UPDATE: not Bertone)
Fiat introduced its 1500 model in 1935. Although it was the first Fiat with rounded, curved shapes, soon many coachbuilders got their hands on it and created special versions. For instance Zagato made one and Viotti built several. However, the one shown here, a 1500 roadster from 1937, remains a mystery despite some investigation by Job van Huizen. There has been a roadster version based on the 1...

Page 5 of 21