The News
Riley 9 Brooklands - Always creates a smile
Anya By R. J. de Little

American-Car-Makes-140x40

Newsletter



Name
Email


The Magazine

The radiator keeps the ladies warm

The radiator keeps the ladies warm.When the Oldsmobile Company wanted to promote their car in 1920, ( we think it's a Model 45-B ) they asked two cheerful ladies to dress up warm so they could photograph them sitting on the wings ( fenders) of the car.
It is not particularly clean, so perhaps it was an impromptu photo session after the occupants were taken by the beauty of Rock Creek Park ?
Either way, the ladies look warm enough clutching the hot radiator cap and we see the flowing river plus a hint of a shadow so perhaps the snow is thawing.
No footprints and no snow on their shoes, so we wonder how far these ladies were driven perched in their precarious position before arriving at the chosen spot ?
Modern media is reminding us to prepare for trouble when going out in our cars this winter - take a spade to dig yourself out of snow, a flask of hot tea/coffee, warm clothes, food, and ensure your tyres have good treads etc. 
Judging by the treadless tyres on the front wheels, our Oldsmobile crew seem to be relying on the car company's advert which boasts a position of acknowledged leadership which has... " built up a very definite and sound protection to every purchaser of its product."

Well, friends, if you do venture out in the snow, common sense will see you through and remember to take a camera so we can all enjoy your adventure.

Text Robin Batchelor, picture courtesy SHORPY.

Friday, 06 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

Is this 'special' up to the Bentley standard?

Is this special up to the Bentley standard?
Specials: the beginning of endless discussions in the classic car world. Some time ago, we had such a discussion with JP from Victorycars and he told us about a Bentley special that he had on his stock list. To be honest, we were not immediately convinced, so he invited us over to take the special for a spin and experience the car first-hand.  
 
The basis of the car is a 1938 Rolls Royce Wraith chassis with a Bentley Sedanca de Ville body on it. However, the most special part is its engine. A real piece of craftsmanship.
First, some information about the man who built it: Gary Wales. He is well known for his specials such as La Bestioni. It took Wales 10 years to build this Bentley 'Royal Custom', which can be seen in the details. 
For the engine, he used 2 Rolls engines, 5.75 l 8-in-line, with crankshafts geared together on a common crankcase – the same design that Ettore Bugatti used for the U-16 aircraft engine. When we started the engine, you can hear the gears. It sounds a bit mechanical as a result of the common crankcase gears. 
 
At the beginning of our ride, the car didn’t have the power that I had expected; yet, after just a couple of minutes, I could feel the engine getting cleaner and the drive getting better and better by minute. 
The amount of power that the car has is perfect for serious touring. We were lucky; the sun started to shine, so we opened the roof (made out of the hide of an elephant) and we went for cruise.    
 
The interior is what you can expect from a Bentley: extremely comfortable. The dashboard, however, is a bit filled. Because there are two engines, there are also double the amount of instruments.
 
Our conclusion is that JP successfully convinced us about the quality of this car. What an amazing vehicle!  It is indeed a special built by a hobbyist, made out of different parts of cars, but it looks as if it were an original factory built car – a car that they could have been made at the Bentley factory. 
 
We were so enthusiastic about this car that we invited this Bentley ‘Royal Coupe’ special to be present at our PreWarCar.com- PostWarClassic.com stand during the 2017 Interclassics Maastricht. 
 
The classic car show Interclassics will take place next week (January 12th – 15th, 2017) in the South of the Netherlands. If you are interested to see the car for yourself, please come visit us in the North Hall. You won’t be able to miss this big beautiful red car!
     
Thursday, 05 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

PreWarCar Workshop: An exploding dynamo

Amilcar dynamo_explodedWhen you start up your beloved vintage machine and the ampere-meter reads a steep discharge, something might be going on with your charging device (when equipped!). In this case, I wanted to check the status of this dynamo and took of the brush cover to see what I would find.

Well, if you find what you see in the picture on the right, something did fail. In my case, the commutator had come loose and ground the inside of the dynamo to small pieces. The whole thing was crushed on the inside, no usable parts were left. Note that it was still turning and when the engine ran, it was still grinding and eating away more of the inside of this unit.
Amilcar dynamo

Since these units proved hard to find, and when found, owners warned us for how fragile they are and that this seems to happen more often, we chose a different way.

The idea we used came from Andrew Mitchell Automotive Engineering from South Australia. It seems that in Amilcar dynamo_partsAustralia, Amilcars (from which this unit came) have long had generator problems. They adapted Model-T generators to fit the Amilcar with success. The difference between this article and Andrew Mitchell's idea is that we use the original Amilcar housing (they do use the same Kubota dynamo as I did).

The new dynamo's housing is turned to size, the shaft is made new to fit and the Amilcar dynamo_finishedwires are connected to the original terminals. The old bearings are renewed and used in their original locations. This unit doesn't have the radiator-fan attachment on the back but if that was present, it could still be used in this setup. From the outside, it looks completely original. Under the dashboard of the car, a new regulator is mounted out of sight and the whole setup functions again like normal!

Please view the photo album here: https://goo.gl/photos/NpyKQHVPvju9q6QE7

Note: on the new Google Photo's album, the comments are "more hidden". Click on the photo and find my comment in the top-right corner of the page.

Article written by Jos van Genugten.


If you want to publish an article of a repair that you made, or do you have a technical question; feel free to send an email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

An early Belvallette car body

An early Belvallette car bodyThis 1891 Panhard & Levassor dogcart was one of the first cars of the famous make and probably used by Hippolyte Panhard himself. In P&L code the type was a P2C of 1.5 H.P., in which the P stands for the Daimler engine, the 2 for the 2 cylinders (in V) and the C for chain drive. The car was not only bodied, but practically built by the well known coachbuilding firm Belvallette frères. Their offer of 430 francs included the frame, the body (weighing only 30 kgs.!), the iron mountings of the seats, upholstering and four wooden wheels. Not included: the cost of painting, which depended on the total surface that required painting. Axles, springs and lamps were also not included. Just as the ingenious canopy with fours straps, weighing only 12 kgs. The 'douloureuse' (or total amount) would finally add up to 500 to 600 francs. In 1895 the price for a Panhard & Levassor with a similar body was 5,000 francs. It's hard to recalculate how much that would have been in our currency in 2017, but a conservative estimate would be € 50,000! In 1904 the average weight of a body had increased to 300 kgs, taking the price for the body only to an equal ten-fold level of 5,000 francs. In the same year prices for the chassis ranged from 7,000 francs for the smaller models to a staggering 45,000 francs for a 60 H.P. model. In these days the threshold for becoming an auto-addict was high ...

Words and picture: Ariejan Bos

This 1891 Panhard & Levassor dogcart was one of the first cars of the famous make and probably used by Hyppolite Panhard himself. The type was in P&L code a P2C of 1.5 H.P., in which the M stands for the Daimler engine, the 2 for the 2 cylinders (in V) and the C for chain drive. The car was not only bodied, but practically built by the well known coachbuilding firm Belvallette frères. Their offer of 430 francs included the frame, the body (weighing only 30 kgs.!), the iron mountings of the seats, upholstering and four wooden wheels. Not included: the cost of painting, which depended on the total surface that required painting. Axles, springs and lamps were also not included. Just as the ingenious canopy with fours straps, weighing only 12 kgs. The 'douloureuse' (or total amount) would finally add up to 500 to 600 francs. In 1895 the price for a Panhard & Levassor with a similar body was 5,000 francs. It's hard to recalculate how much that would have been in our currency in 2017, but a conservative estimate would be € 50,000! In 1904 the average weight of a body had increased to 300 kgs, taking the price for the body alone to an equal ten-fold level of 5,000 francs. A year before the prices for the chassis ranged from 7,000 francs for the smaller models to a staggering 45,000 francs for a 60 H.P. Model. In these days the threshold for becoming an auto-addict was high ...

Tuesday, 03 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

Page 4 of 643

The Market

Visitors Online

We have 1472 guests and 11 members online
Prewarcar logo_cmyk_highres

Editor's Choice

1934 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3
Campaigned by Scuderia Ferrari during the 1934 and 1935 Grand Prix seasons: 1934 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3 ...   Go >>