The News
Grand Prix ACF Dieppe today and in 1907
My Chalmers at Shelsley Walsh Hillclimb

American-Car-Makes-140x40

The Magazine

China here we come: 9(!) pre-war motorcars plus more

China here we come!

We promised you a BIG chance to win one of the two free entries to the Classic Car Challenge China provided by PreWarCar-PostWarClassic. Well, we didn't want to disappoint you. So in view of the really unexpected large number of entries we decided to change BIG into BIGGGG! We now give out fourteen in stead of just two free entries. So now in total a group of fourteen pre-war cars and post-war classics will get the opportunity to rally China North-South, from Beijing to Shanghai.

Here are the motorcars of the lucky ones, it appears US built cars are quite popular for making miles in China. Above: a 1912 Hudson '33' (bought from Hyman Ltd. in St Louis, USA, see earlier showroom picture), then a well known and extensively campaigned 1911 Knox, a 1914 Overland, a 1921 Stutz and a 1930 Model A Phaeton. Glad there are a few others as well: a 1922 Amilcar C4 (courageous participant!), a 1929 Hotchkiss AM801934 Riley Lynx and finally a refined saloon: 1934 Lancia Belna. As if that's not enough there is also a post-war delegation with a wellknown MGA, once owned by Pat Moss...

We'll keep you posted while these cars are being prepared for the 4C China adventure early October! 

Thursday, 25 June 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

What happened to 1924 RR 20HP XR2983? (UPDATE: still registered!)

What happened to the Rolls Royce XR2983

Pete Giles found this car at the bottom of a drawer of which he has many we presume. In the drawer is an envelop with a post date of 1964... and it contains these photos showing XR.2983 after a hard days work. Or even worse at the last parking lot it visited. We just don't know what happened to 'The Best Pick-Up of The World' and like Peter we are most anxious to learn what became of her. Maybe if you make a quick stroll around the car that your memory will start producing facts. Why not start at the rear end. Then admire the cabin's profile. Have a quick glimpse at the motor department. And finally take a deep breath from the ripened interior. Does it bring back memories form a time and life forgotten? 

(Pictures courtesy of Pete Giles)

Wednesday, 24 June 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

It pays to post your Mystery Issue

pre 1910  ohv jap engine?
      

Yesterday Robert Axelrod posted the above photos showing off the NOS(?) early JAP engine he found; and there must be zillions of similar issues: "This motor turned up at Hershey, PA swap meet! Trying to date it! The cam cover is from a later motor, modified to fit this motor! The pinion shaft is extra long and would stick out through the cam cover, so this motor was never a motorcycle engine! Maybe cycle car, aero? Bore and stroke 85.5mmx95mm, rocker arms are numbered 13,14,15,16. I am thinking this motor is a 1906, as the motor # is 6101, case # 1, some of the internal parts-rods, cam followers are stamped #1, any ideas on the year and appaication for this engine will be appreciated! Thank you for your time!"

Within a few hours he received this answer from G. Chivrall: "I acquired an engine like this in about 1978. Only 5 fins and no knuckles on the ends of the pushrod, 85x85mm cylinders, conical valves screw in valve guides mine has fins on the exhaust. Your's looks dead right and the timing cover looks original to me too. I've concluded mine is about 1908. There are engines from "the same drawing board" (V-8s) in the UK Science Museum in an aeroplane and in the Shuttleworth Collection from an airship. There is also a V8 campaigned in VSCC events by Richard Scaldwell (hope thats spelled correctly). These engines are super and well worth getting running. Powerful and economical but very clattery. They get hot, I put a bit of metanol in the petrol. Watch out for cracks between the valve seats,in the flywheels and cranckcase but your's looks in very good order.

The long front mainshaft is a bit of a mystery. I don't think the breather should be connected to the bottom of the crankase. JAP oiling is mysterious but it works. I used a drip feed to the crankcase outboard of the left cylinder (in picture) through a little non return plate valve. Use plenty of "R". It could be from a cyclecar, motorbike or primitive aeroplane. Although the valve gear is different you will probably find that pistons,flywheels and conrods from later engines can be used, and people are making new stuff these days. There is even a chap in Australia who makes 90 Bore castings which are similar to this engine. Google "JAP 90 Bore" and screen out all the oriental motorbile stuff. I believe the 85 bore OHVs pre-date the 90 Bore which is well represented in the literature.There is very little about the 85 bore ohv's. Good luck with it!"

So if you have an unsolved issue. Just give it a try! You never know what may come out.

Tuesday, 23 June 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

The first car in Romania was a ...? (UPDATE: 1901 Braun voiturette)

mystery car_first_romanian_car_owner_basil_assan_470

Bogdan Coconoiu from Romania writes: "A friend of mine, mr. Madalin Ghigeanu, sent me this interesting photo probably from 1900. We supose that the driver is mr.  Basil Assan the first romanian car owner. To me the car looks like a De Dion but please ask the readers of your site in order to identify corectly this vehicle. On 27th June we organise the 5th edition of Sinaia Concours d'Elegance, I will send you a short report and photos."

Monday, 22 June 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

Page 4 of 501

The Market

Newsletter



Name
Email


Post War Choice

1973 Jaguar XKE Convertible
Ready for anything: 1973 Jaguar XKE Convertible...  Go >>