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PATAN in Lekkerkerk
Hi can anyone identify this car please? (update: Calcott or Standard?)

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What is it? Quiz #420

What is it? Quiz #420
Once upon a time in England in the late 1920s a driver spotted an Airship in the sky so he stopped, grabbed his Box Brownie, and walked over to the other side of the road into the hedge. Click!  He captured this memorable image of the Graf Zeppelin with his beloved car in the foreground. ( A rare sight for interwar years.)
But what is his car?  It is British-made and the friend who sent us the picture said it was a Morris - it is not, but it did successfully compete with the Morris Cowley market.
Any more clues will make it too easy, so over to you dear reader and please tell us all you know about the car and be as specific as possible. Be sure to send in before Monday, May 16 in order to have a chance to win the infamous PreWarCar T-shirt. Best is to check the Rules under 'Read more' first. Enjoy a wonderful spring weekend!
Saturday, 14 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

These ladies are still smiling near Count Dracula's castle. (update: old quiz car...)

Dracula castle_mystery-470
An old friend would like to know the make/model of this vintage touring car.  Collective family memory says it's a Nash but no one is sure but it does bear a strong resemblance to a late 1920s model.
The picture is taken next to the entrance of the Royal Castle of Bran, better known these days as Count Dracula's Castle from the 1897 Gothic horror novel by Bram Stoker. The two ladies in the car seem quite relaxed and happy, despite the vampire habits of the Transylvanian monster that lived there. It's a wonderful story which has transfixed each new generation with  progressively modernised film adaptations of the old myth.
Those of you with good memories may remember Mary McConnell Borah, a friday lady from 2014 , who met a resident of Bran Castle - Princess Ileana of Romania - and amongst these pictures of  the Princess there is one of her standing beside her husband and his aeroplane. Am I dreaming or could it be the lady on the right of today's picture?
The date today is friday 13th - unlucky for some - but fortune seems to have favoured our merry band of motorists. However, they were born too early and are therefore unlucky not to have had the chance to thrash their Nash down the nearby Transfagarasan highway -  built between 1970 and1974 on the personal orders of Nicolae Ceausescu. This 150 km long spectacular road which passes over the Fagaras mountains in Transylvania was made famous by the TV Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson after filming an episode there and describing it as "The World's best driving road."
It's on our bucket list!

Text Robin Batchelor, picture courtesy Radu Comsa.

(UPDATE: Robert Marenzi reciogniesd the photo from a quiz we did in 2014. ( His memory obviosuly is better than ours!) The car depicted is -  sorry Robin , not a Nash - a Buick Master Six


Friday, 13 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

Throwback Thursday: Who's that guy next to Dirk Regter?

jay leno_dirk_regter_model_t_world_tour_470

In 2012 The Model T Wolrd Tour started and moved from Europe down to Capetown. The tour continued in Houston and they did something close to 16000 miles in the US within a few months. Yes, all that on their own 1915 Model T wheels. After that they did the full tour of South America and after that they experienced a horrible set back when the car was crushed while being transported on a trailer through Belgium. But skinny Dirk Regter is a real  Bazooka Joe kid, so 'tough enough to chew the hard stuff'. His planning is to present the totally rebuilt Model T at the 2016 Concours Het Loo, at the Royal Palace in Apeldoorn. From there it will be New Zealand, Australia, south-east Asia, China, Mongolia... Pictured above Dirk having fun with a local TV hero that he once met in California. Sorry, forgot his name. Better ask Dirk Regter

EARLIER TEXT:
Dirk Regter's Model T is getting him in places. While touring in California Jay Leno hopped on board and had Dirk explain him about the alterations he made to make the Model T a highly reliable world travelling machine. They had a big time when Jay gave the Model T Worldtour team a private tour in his well occupied Garage.  He owns about anything you can imagine on wheels, yet not everything. A slightly painful moment came up when Jay became really-really excited and made Dirk an offer on his high end Model T. Well a man can't own everything... And so the Model T World Tour is travelling on, The Nethercutt Collection and Mullin Automotive Museum and very special PWC friend Roger Bowers  as next appointments.

When you know of places or people they must see? Let us know.
Thursday, 12 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

A petrol sipping Austin in Brisbane (UPDATE: est. 35 mpg ! )

Brisbane vintage_auto_club_petrol_consumption_test_rally_1977-470

A few weeks ago we asked you to send in your memories  about fuel consumption tests in the past. Reg Harris from Australia did send this report. It may be a good thing in this super green era to set up something similar and show how efficient some of these old cars can be. Maybe even close to one of those modern German Diesels...

UPDATE: we asked Reg what his fuel consumption was back then, he came back with: "
Unfortunately i didn’t keep a lot of paperwork when we downsized houses 2 years ago. From memory I think that on one occasion the Austin got about 35 mpg (edit. which is about 14,5 kilometer to the liter; not bad Reg!!).
Not great but on most runs i was involved in the organising and so did the run on a “last to leave, first back basis.”

 



"During the 1970’s and early 80’s, The Brisbane Vintage Auto Club  (Queensland, Australia) conducted several “Petrol Consumption Runs” as part of their program for events open to other Clubs. It was common to attract probably around 60 or so entrants. What a day that was for the organisers! Having to arrange with a service station to take over one lane and pump at the start and finish of the day.

The procedure was – fill the tank, bringing the fuel up the filler pipe to a position where the distance from the top could be recorded or the breather pipe overflowed. Since all cars were pre 1942 models, this was possible. Then followed a run of 100 – 120 miles followed with a return to the same pump for a refill to the same recorded level. The run included a stop at a public weighbridge to weigh the vehicle with driver and passengers for a gross weight as rallied.

Then came the mathematicians’ job - no personal computers and online calculators in those days. Cars were weighed in tonnes and fuel measured in litres but, in keeping with the era of the cars, results were calculated as miles/gallon and ton-miles/gallon.

1940 Austin_petrol_consumtion_test_brisbane-800There were some spectacular results. There was much coasting and “eggshell” throttle pressure by the really keen contestants for the outright MPG and T/MPG prizes. Trophies were awarded for various engine capacity categories for both MPG and T/MPG. One member consistently took out the trophy for the overall T/MPG in his 1934 Ford V8 sedan by loading with four people, picnic gear and all available space taken with old batteries.

I usually entered in my 1940 Austin 10 sedan and although I never took out a prize Pam & I had a lot of fun. I include a photo of my car and the Rally Plaques given on the day."

(Words and pictures: Reg Harris)

During the 1970’s and early 80’s, The Brisbane Vintage Auto Club  (Queensland, Australia) conducted several “Petrol Consumption Runs” as part of their program for events open to other Clubs. It was common to attract probably around 60 or so entrants. What a day that was for the organisers! Having to arrange with a service station to take over one lane and pump at the start and finish of the day.

The procedure was – fill the tank, bringing the fuel up the filler pipe to a position where the distance from the top could be recorded or the breather pipe overflowed. Since all cars were pre 1942 models, this was possible. Then followed a run of 100 – 120 miles followed with a return to the same pump for a refill to the same recorded level. The run included a stop at a public weighbridge to weigh the vehicle with driver and passengers for a gross weight as rallied.

Then came the mathematicians’ job - no personal computers in those days. Cars were weighed in tonnes and fuel measured in litres but, in keeping with the era of the cars, results were calculated as miles/gallon and ton-miles/gallon.

There were some spectacular results. There was much coasting and “eggshell” throttle pressure by the really keen contestants for the outright MPG and T/MPG prizes. Trophies were awarded for various engine capacity categories for both MPG and T/MPG. One member consistently took out the trophy for the overall T/MPG in his 1934 Ford V8 sedan by loading with four people, picnic gear and all available space taken with old batteries.

I usually entered in my 1940 Austin 10 sedan and although I never took out a prize Pam & I had a lot of fun. I include a photo of my car and the Rally Plaques given on the day.

Reg Harris

Wednesday, 11 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

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