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Throwback Thursday: Who's that guy next to Dirk Regter?

jay leno_dirk_regter_model_t_world_tour_470

In 2012 The Model T Wolrd Tour started and moved from Europe down to Capetown. The tour continued in Houston and they did something close to 16000 miles in the US within a few months. Yes, all that on their own 1915 Model T wheels. After that they did the full tour of South America and after that they experienced a horrible set back when the car was crushed while being transported on a trailer through Belgium. But skinny Dirk Regter is a real  Bazooka Joe kid, so 'tough enough to chew the hard stuff'. His planning is to present the totally rebuilt Model T at the 2016 Concours Het Loo, at the Royal Palace in Apeldoorn. From there it will be New Zealand, Australia, south-east Asia, China, Mongolia... Pictured above Dirk having fun with a local TV hero that he once met in California. Sorry, forgot his name. Better ask Dirk Regter

EARLIER TEXT:
Dirk Regter's Model T is getting him in places. While touring in California Jay Leno hopped on board and had Dirk explain him about the alterations he made to make the Model T a highly reliable world travelling machine. They had a big time when Jay gave the Model T Worldtour team a private tour in his well occupied Garage.  He owns about anything you can imagine on wheels, yet not everything. A slightly painful moment came up when Jay became really-really excited and made Dirk an offer on his high end Model T. Well a man can't own everything... And so the Model T World Tour is travelling on, The Nethercutt Collection and Mullin Automotive Museum and very special PWC friend Roger Bowers  as next appointments.

When you know of places or people they must see? Let us know.
Thursday, 12 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

A petrol sipping Austin in Brisbane (UPDATE: est. 35 mpg ! )

Brisbane vintage_auto_club_petrol_consumption_test_rally_1977-470

A few weeks ago we asked you to send in your memories  about fuel consumption tests in the past. Reg Harris from Australia did send this report. It may be a good thing in this super green era to set up something similar and show how efficient some of these old cars can be. Maybe even close to one of those modern German Diesels...

UPDATE: we asked Reg what his fuel consumption was back then, he came back with: "
Unfortunately i didn’t keep a lot of paperwork when we downsized houses 2 years ago. From memory I think that on one occasion the Austin got about 35 mpg (edit. which is about 14,5 kilometer to the liter; not bad Reg!!).
Not great but on most runs i was involved in the organising and so did the run on a “last to leave, first back basis.”

 



"During the 1970’s and early 80’s, The Brisbane Vintage Auto Club  (Queensland, Australia) conducted several “Petrol Consumption Runs” as part of their program for events open to other Clubs. It was common to attract probably around 60 or so entrants. What a day that was for the organisers! Having to arrange with a service station to take over one lane and pump at the start and finish of the day.

The procedure was – fill the tank, bringing the fuel up the filler pipe to a position where the distance from the top could be recorded or the breather pipe overflowed. Since all cars were pre 1942 models, this was possible. Then followed a run of 100 – 120 miles followed with a return to the same pump for a refill to the same recorded level. The run included a stop at a public weighbridge to weigh the vehicle with driver and passengers for a gross weight as rallied.

Then came the mathematicians’ job - no personal computers and online calculators in those days. Cars were weighed in tonnes and fuel measured in litres but, in keeping with the era of the cars, results were calculated as miles/gallon and ton-miles/gallon.

1940 Austin_petrol_consumtion_test_brisbane-800There were some spectacular results. There was much coasting and “eggshell” throttle pressure by the really keen contestants for the outright MPG and T/MPG prizes. Trophies were awarded for various engine capacity categories for both MPG and T/MPG. One member consistently took out the trophy for the overall T/MPG in his 1934 Ford V8 sedan by loading with four people, picnic gear and all available space taken with old batteries.

I usually entered in my 1940 Austin 10 sedan and although I never took out a prize Pam & I had a lot of fun. I include a photo of my car and the Rally Plaques given on the day."

(Words and pictures: Reg Harris)

During the 1970’s and early 80’s, The Brisbane Vintage Auto Club  (Queensland, Australia) conducted several “Petrol Consumption Runs” as part of their program for events open to other Clubs. It was common to attract probably around 60 or so entrants. What a day that was for the organisers! Having to arrange with a service station to take over one lane and pump at the start and finish of the day.

The procedure was – fill the tank, bringing the fuel up the filler pipe to a position where the distance from the top could be recorded or the breather pipe overflowed. Since all cars were pre 1942 models, this was possible. Then followed a run of 100 – 120 miles followed with a return to the same pump for a refill to the same recorded level. The run included a stop at a public weighbridge to weigh the vehicle with driver and passengers for a gross weight as rallied.

Then came the mathematicians’ job - no personal computers in those days. Cars were weighed in tonnes and fuel measured in litres but, in keeping with the era of the cars, results were calculated as miles/gallon and ton-miles/gallon.

There were some spectacular results. There was much coasting and “eggshell” throttle pressure by the really keen contestants for the outright MPG and T/MPG prizes. Trophies were awarded for various engine capacity categories for both MPG and T/MPG. One member consistently took out the trophy for the overall T/MPG in his 1934 Ford V8 sedan by loading with four people, picnic gear and all available space taken with old batteries.

I usually entered in my 1940 Austin 10 sedan and although I never took out a prize Pam & I had a lot of fun. I include a photo of my car and the Rally Plaques given on the day.

Reg Harris

Wednesday, 11 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

Mystery six in line and body remains (update: 1946/47 Rover P2 engine?)

which engine ??

Mr. Andersen is sending a curious request asking you to indentify an engine and part(?) of a body of which only the firewall is showing.  We wonder is there nothing else to see or doesn't Mr. Andersen want us to see the full picture? Very strange. Anyway this hobby is full of strange corners and let's say intriguing people.  
Anyway he cannot identify the 6 cylinder engine with its slightly unusual sparkplug arrangement. 'Does anybody know what 6 cylinder engine this is?' The alloy valvecover has a brass plate saying in English that the tappet clearance should be 010". The engine itself is numbered #7410494 or 74/0494. Mr. Andersen is also keeping the remainders of a body (connected with this engine) with the number ST 543. It's not sure if engine and shown firewall are from the one and same car. Any ideas? Or opinions for what it's worth...

UPDATE: here finally some photos from the outer looks of the car (click here) 
   
Tuesday, 10 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

Another steaming hot day in The Netherlands

Elfsteden-470
Last weekend the Dutch (or to some, Frysk) 'Elfstedentocht' was held for cars built before 1949. This year, it was the 31st and it was a warm edition after an extremely cold spring.  The biggest problems were the sun on our white skins and radiators getting warmer and warmer.
The Elfstedenrally (or in English Eleven City Tour) is a tribute to the famous long distance speed skating tour in the north of The Netherlands. This route is about 250 km and you need to get a stamp at each of the eleven cities to get the finisher plaquette. This is no torture as this is arguably one of the best looking areas of The Netherlands.
The most impressive aspect of the tour is the number of participants. With 600 cars & motorcycles on the road in the same tour it's a bit like going back in time. Wherever you look, it's classic cars, classic cars, classic cars  and... classic motorcycles. Parked at gas stations, in front of shops and waiting at traffic lights. The picture is accurate in the sense that most cars are Model A Fords, Citroens (B14, C3, C4) and be it in smaller numbers MG, Riley and Alvis as well.  Elfsteden schildje-800

Not only the participating cars came in great numbers. Spectators  as well. Thousands of locals are very well aware of this event, this museum on wheels.  From 7 in the morning all along the 150 mile route, people were sitting on the roadside and drinking, eating and having fun.

It was another great Eleven City Tour with lots of fun, great cars and great people. We are happy that there are still that many people who really enjoy the early cars and we would like to know what classic car-thing you did last weekend. Let us know in a comment below.

(text and photos Laurens Klein)
Monday, 09 May 2016 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

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