The News
Massive Ahrens Fox Pumper
Unknown Benz from 1919 (?)


The Magazine

Frozen frame of time or new chapter? (update: Mercedes & Laurin & Klement)

two pre_ww1_mysteries_1-470

What makes these photos so much more interesting than modern 'pics'. Is it just their relative scarcity compared to the billion of pictures flooding from smartphone and other devices?  Who on earth would still like to share a photo of the family getting ready to drive off? This kind of pictures tell a story, they are much more alive than the frozen fame of time that you see at first glance. Here we have a wealthy family, not leaving for the nearest shopping mall to kill two hours of a boring afternoon. These people are leaving for a considerable trip. Maybe a weekend. Maybe an autumn day tour. Maybe leaving for family abroad. Seen from that perspective the simple act of cranking the engine is much more than the hand turning. It is more like opening the next chapter of a good book. 

Peter Skofic writes: "On the flee market I found the above picture of an Edwardian car and two pictures (picture 1 and  picture 2) of another Edwardian car. All photos were taken in Pregrada - respectively in 1q912 and 1913 -  a small village on the nowadays Slovene/Croatian border. Can anybody of the PreWarCar readers identify these two cars?"

Tuesday, 15 September 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail

Is this a two-stroke JAP engine? ( update: 1923 AZA-Prestwich)

Is this a JAP engine.

Dr Graham Smith writes: "Can anyone identify this 2 stroke engine? It has a Bing carburettor and ML magneto. It is about 150cc and has a decompression valve on the cylinder head. There is a small circular brass plate on the casting which contains the magneto drive chain which reads, "J A Prestwich" which suggests that it is a JAP, but this may have been added later. Please ignore the bike in which it is fixed as this is one that was made up last year to look like an Indian racer. We would like to find out the age, is it a genuine JAP, and what it was used for. Any information would be much appreciated."
Monday, 14 September 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail

Vintage Roads in Scotland

Vintage Roads

"Very often, it's only after a brief trip to the south of England or some parts of Europe that I learn to appreciate just how deserted many of our roads are in Scotland, and how little many of them have changed since our vintage vehicles were driving on them daily. One road which I drive regularly in a vintage car is the A93 Spittal of Glenshee road, originally known as "The Devil's Elbow". It's the highest road in the UK at 2199 feet - comparatively small in comparison to the Stelvio Pass at 9043 feet! In 1907 the Scottish Reliability Trials crossed the Devil's Elbow, it was here that the Rolls Royce Silver Ghost made a significant name for itself. 

In memory and respect of those who tested cars around the Devil's Elbow 100 years ago, every time I cross Glenshee in a vintage car, I deliberately turn off into the layby halfway up and exit discreetly onto the old road. I've crossed it in my Rolls Royce Silver Ghost, Vauxhall 30/98 and in reverse in a 1914 Renault. Yesterday I did it in my faithful old Austin 12/4. The most frightening part was hoping that the handbrake held as I took the photograph! A nostalgic drive on a forgotten road."

(text and photos Ian Murray)   

Sunday, 13 September 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail

What is it? Quiz #403

what is_it_quiz_403_470

Well, why not show you a quiz-truck for a change. It's interesting in more than one respect and there is a chance that you know it from earlier publication. The powerful truck was designed by a very talented American engineer, but not in the USA. Still the inspiration primarily came from products made by Relay Motor Trucks and were meant for harsh conditions. The finished product was advertised as 'Powerful enough for the worst roads. Fast enough for the best. ' Two type of trucks were produced and interestingly on the other end of the spectrum, also a three wheel two cylinder, two stroke cyclecar. Unfortunately this came never in production but the career of this pioneering american in country far from home is a more than interesting read. But before we show you all that, we invite you to share your knowledge about this rare truck and have a shot in winning the infamous PreWarCar T-shirt. Start with mentioning the presumed Make, Year & Type. And further whatever you may know about the car. 

Answers in the comment box please, post it before Monday September 14  and you may become the winner of this week's pre-war Quiz. Be careful though, check the Rules under 'Read More' first. Results and source of photo will be published next Saturday, September 19. Enjoy weekend!

Saturday, 12 September 2015 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail

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The Market



Post War Choice

1956 Packard Four Hundred Hardtop
Off to the drive in cinema: 1956 Packard Four Hundred Hardtop...  Go >>