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Ex-chief is looking for his old fire truck

search for fire truck

Karl W. Riesterer Jr. sent us the picture shown above. He is the ex-chief with the West Hempstead Fire Department on Long Island, New York and they are looking for their first fire engine. It was a 1927 Seagrave “6AT” 600-gallon pump T hose cart, serial number 49540. It had a 15-H 6-cylinder engine, serial number 3-15H605, and pump serial # 6826 Manister 4 stage.
'We took delivery on August 16, 1927 and it served us well until 1946. We then sold it to our brother department in upstate, Yulan, New York. There it again served well till the early 1960s. They then sold it to the Mill Rift Fire Department in eastern Pennsylvania. They kept it several years and have no record of who they sold it to. Senior members of their department say it may have gone down south.
It is unique because it was in an accident in 1936 and new “modern” rolled edge fenders, windshield, electric siren and relocation of the bell and warning fights was done, as shown in the picture of it competing in a firematic tournament in the late 1930s.
Any information or even a possible lead from any of the area fire companies would be greatly appreciated. Perhaps someone has seen it in a local parade or maybe in a field or behind a barn. Anything would be helpful in this chapter of our departments’ history that several members before me have been unable to solve. I would appreciate your help as we approach our 100 th anniversary in 2019.
We have found and restored our other Seagrave in the firehouse photo, our 1931 Seagrave City Service Ladder Truck.'

      
Monday, 23 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

The new Oldsmobile; the F-series

The new Oldsmobile; the F-series
For 1928 Oldsmobile introduced its 'F' series of automobiles.  The cars featured a longer chassis with a 113.5 inch wheelbase and larger more powerful flat head six cylinder  engine with 197 cubic inches putting out 55 horsepower at 2700 r.p.m.. These differences set the line apart from its predecessors. The series featured twelve different body styles including this fully restored F-28 4-dr. sedan in stunning burgundy and black. This spotless car has had a complete frame up restoration with no expense spared for completion about ten years ago. The grey interior is correct in every way.   The radiator shutters would close to create more warmth for the engine in cold weather or starts.
These Oldsmobile’s were fairly rare even when new with only 1221 built of this specific model.  The amount left in existence today is inestimable but rare no matter how many it is.  Oldsmobile seased production on April 29, 2004.  The Oldsmobile Motor Company was formed in 1897 and the 1901-04 Curved Dash Oldsmobile was America’s most popular car in some of those early days.  Many spectacular cars were produced by Oldsmobile  until General Motors decided to no longer produce them.  The Oldsmobile Clue of America has a large and loyal following and many automotive events see pleanty of the Lancing, Michigan built cars still in attendance. There were over 35 million Oldsmobile’s built during the 107 year history.

Words and photo's: Bob Lichty
  
Sunday, 22 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

What is it Quiz #437 The 10 mistakes of raising chickens.

Quiz 437b_002

Raising chickens can be a very rewarding process. Besides providing you with fresh eggs, it can also be a teaching resource for your children and a way for you to become self-sufficient. There are a few mistakes that people, however, make when they first start raising chickens.

I came across a website about raising chickens, when I searched for a clue to give you about the car in the picture of this week's quiz.

What has raising chickens to do with this car, you wonder? Well, the car in the picture was certainly not "the best car in the world", as the keystone shape of the radiator may be suggests. In fact, one of the assembly line workers said that the company engineer "should have raised poultry instead."

Before the First World War the automobiles of this company were well-built, long-lasting and famous because of their slogan, but after the war all was different.

Anyway we want you to tell us about the car shown here. Give us your best shot regarding Make, Year & Type plus any (trivial) information you may have at hand. As you know the details often determine the winner! And as usual, also in 2017, take care not to use more than 100 words, send in your answer before Monday and don't forget to check the rules under 'Read more'.
 

 

Saturday, 21 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

Any colour as long as it's black.

Any colour as long as its black.When we saw this picture we immediately wondered what colour this 1934 Ford would have been painted.  Computer experts are writing new software all the time and it is becoming easier to do very clever things with our computers.
That means some people are enjoying 'colourising' old black and white images with very good results.
Little did the smart well-dressed lady realise that someone in the future would be changing the colour of her skirt to suit the changing colour of the car.

1934FordVictoria34fordbrown1934fordbw

Which do you prefer?
Henry Ford is famous for mass production and we can believe he once said ..."Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants so long as it is black."
He was experimenting with the assembly line, at the time, and only fast-drying black paint allowed for "full-speed" assembly. 
Whether he said it or not, it's good advertising and although we are unable to give you the name of the elegant lady, we can have a stab at identifying the car and we have come up with 1934 Ford Victoria.
As always, we welcome information you can offer about Ford colour schemes and perhaps the lady's name, and before you ask.... No, we didn't change the car's colour. We are not clever enough. Besides, we are too busy mending/driving our old cars and we hope you are too.

Text Robin Batchelor, picture courtesy SHORPY, colourised by 'Motobean'.
Friday, 20 January 2017 Attention: open in a new window. Print E-mail
   

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